Fautoritas Linguae Latinae Fautoritas Culturarum Classicarum

Ut sequaris o-eheu in Tumblr Preme ut me sequaris!

O, Eheu!

Aug
20

Ursa cumminea - (f.) gummy bear
-Beniaminus

Ursa cumminea (f.) gummy bear

-Beniaminus

(Source: fiftyshadesofcanunot, via run-rhianna-run)

Annotationes: gummy bears latin latin translation latin language lingua latina tagamemnon

Aug
20

sandy3151 said: Salve! I couldn't help noticing your translation of 'Let love grow' and felt like commenting. It looks like you're assuming that it's a jussive subjunctive, but I think the meaning in English is ambiguous and it could be a command to an individual: "(you) let the love grow." I also considered that it could be a third person imperative, but those are only in future and very rare. Just reflecting on the grammar for fun. :) I love your blog and always enjoy seeing your quotation translations.

Of course! Always open to discuss grammar. English-to-Latin is always a little tricky because it’s not always clear.

I do maintain the jussive subjunctive here. Expressing this phrase as an imperative just seems peculiar to me. It’s like saying “Permit the love to grow,” which doesn’t feel right to me in this context. Rather, “May the love grow” seems much better suited to the context.

Thanks for commenting, sandy3151!

-Beniaminus

Annotationes: latin grammar latin latin language lingua latina tagamemnon sandy3151

Aug
19


Amor Crescat

-Beniaminus

Amor Crescat

-Beniaminus

(via silly-luv)

Annotationes: let love grow latin latin translation latin language lingua latina tagamemnon

Aug
19

Rome’s first emperor died 2000 years ago – his derelict tomb is now used as a toilet

archaeologicalnews:

image

Augustus, who died 2000 years ago, was the first emperor of Rome. He brought peace after the turmoil in the republic after the assassination of Julius Caesar when he defeated the forces of Antony and Cleopatra. But despite this, two millennia after he bestrode the world, his mausoleum lies in disrepair under piles of rubbish while his celebrated stables, only discovered five years ago, are to be reburied due to lack of funds.

There’s a rich agenda of special and extravagant events in Rome as it celebrates the 2000th anniversary of the death of Augustus. The city is packed with cultural events, from special exhibitions to the re-enactment of ancient Roman rites. But the restoration of these important monuments are a step too far – one that simply can’t be afforded. Read more.

(via hodie-scolastica)

Annotationes: caesar augustus roman history ancient rome tagamemnon

Aug
19

paintedandlovely:

artemisiaofhalicarnassus:

o-eheu:


Felicem Diem Anniversarium MM Mortis Augusti


Happy 2000th Anniversary of Augustus’ Death!

-Beniaminus

#you’re 2000 candles in the wind

Why on earth would I want to celebrate his death

Because I couldn’t think of any other way to word this.
-Beniaminus

paintedandlovely:

artemisiaofhalicarnassus:

o-eheu:

Felicem Diem Anniversarium MM Mortis Augusti

Happy 2000th Anniversary of Augustus’ Death!

-Beniaminus

Why on earth would I want to celebrate his death

Because I couldn’t think of any other way to word this.

-Beniaminus

Aug
19

The Tense Continuum

interretialia:

o-eheu:

LatinTutorial does a great job explaining the tenses in his video A Theory of Tenses. Without undermining his work, I’d like to propose a different way of thinking about tenses, the way I use. If you’re getting confused, turn back immediately. I may be a terrible explainer.

Let’s first imagine a continuum. We’ll consider the left direction retrospective (looking back to the past) and the right direction prospective (looking toward the future). We also have three time periods: past, present, and future.

image

The present tense is the simplest to understand. The event being described is happening at the same time as the conversation. “He is jumping.” We’ll represent the perspective of the conversation as a person, and we’ll represent the event being described as the red marker.

image

When the described event happened in the past, we use the perfect tense (“Taylor cooked a meal,” or “Jack has climbed.”)…

image

…unless the event happened over a period of time, i.e. it was continual. Then we use the imperfect tense (“Taylor was cooking a meal.”). We also use the imperfect tense to express concepts like “used to…” (“We used to visit Rome often.”)

image

If the described event will happen after the conversation, we’re looking prospectively. We would use the future tense (“Ian will give Ben a cookie.”).

image

So far, the continuum admittedly hasn’t been too helpful. I really only keep it in mind for the two final tenses—pluperfect and future perfect. These are the tenses in which our perspective (yes, the little guy just standing there) changes. Our perspective changes due to context.

Imagine you’re telling a story about the time you went to the store. You start off with “I went to the store.” The “went” immediately establishes that this story takes place in the past, so our perspective is in the past. When you then say “The store had already run out of fruit,” you’re describing an event that had already happened before your designated past (or, to hopefully avoid confusion, the described event is more retrospective than your designated past). This is the pluperfect tense, happening before your past.

image

Finally, we reach the future perfect tense. We use the future perfect tense when context has been established that puts our perspective in the future. The future perfect expresses an action that happens before the designated future, or is more retrospective than our designated future. An example from the UK’s National Archives is the sentence “I won’t get home until 8pm now, by which time the film will have happened.” The first bit, the “I won’t get home until 8pm now…”, establishes our perspective. We are talking about the time when the speaker comes home, 8pm. The second bit, “by which time the film will have happened,” is our future perfect event. Relative to our perspective, 8pm, the film is over.

image

Hopefully this helps someone. It works for me. Also, if you have any commentary or ideas of ways I can improve upon this idea, please share! Gratias!

-Beniaminus

Optime!

(“Ian will give Ben a cookie.”)

I would if I could!

Oh, you saw that. Good.

-Beniaminus

Aug
19


Felicem Diem Anniversarium MM Mortis Augusti



Happy 2000th Anniversary of Augustus’ Death!

-Beniaminus

Felicem Diem Anniversarium MM Mortis Augusti

Happy 2000th Anniversary of Augustus’ Death!

-Beniaminus

Annotationes: caesar augustus roman history roman empire ancient rome latin latin language lingua latina tagamemnon

Aug
18

The Tense Continuum

farewell-to-arms:

o-eheu:

LatinTutorial does a great job explaining the tenses in his video A Theory of Tenses. Without undermining his work, I’d like to propose a different way of thinking about tenses, the way I use. If you’re getting confused, turn back immediately. I may be a terrible explainer.

Let’s first…

thank you soo sososo much 

Hey, this actually helped someone! Awesome!

-Beniaminus

Annotationes: ben has slightly more confidence in himself latin verb tense latin language lingua latina tagamemnon

Aug
18

The Tense Continuum

LatinTutorial does a great job explaining the tenses in his video A Theory of Tenses. Without undermining his work, I’d like to propose a different way of thinking about tenses, the way I use. If you’re getting confused, turn back immediately. I may be a terrible explainer.

Let’s first imagine a continuum. We’ll consider the left direction retrospective (looking back to the past) and the right direction prospective (looking toward the future). We also have three time periods: past, present, and future.

The present tense is the simplest to understand. The event being described is happening at the same time as the conversation. “He is jumping.” We’ll represent the perspective of the conversation as a person, and we’ll represent the event being described as the red marker.

When the described event happened in the past, we use the perfect tense (“Taylor cooked a meal,” or “Jack has climbed.”)…

…unless the event happened over a period of time, i.e. it was continual. Then we use the imperfect tense (“Taylor was cooking a meal.”). We also use the imperfect tense to express concepts like “used to…” (“We used to visit Rome often.”)

If the described event will happen after the conversation, we’re looking prospectively. We would use the future tense (“Ian will give Ben a cookie.”).

So far, the continuum admittedly hasn’t been too helpful. I really only keep it in mind for the two final tenses—pluperfect and future perfect. These are the tenses in which our perspective (yes, the little guy just standing there) changes. Our perspective changes due to context.

Imagine you’re telling a story about the time you went to the store. You start off with “I went to the store.” The “went” immediately establishes that this story takes place in the past, so our perspective is in the past. When you then say “The store had already run out of fruit,” you’re describing an event that had already happened before your designated past (or, to hopefully avoid confusion, the described event is more retrospective than your designated past). This is the pluperfect tense, happening before your past.

Finally, we reach the future perfect tense. We use the future perfect tense when context has been established that puts our perspective in the future. The future perfect expresses an action that happens before the designated future, or is more retrospective than our designated future. An example from the UK’s National Archives is the sentence “I won’t get home until 8pm now, by which time the film will have happened.” The first bit, the “I won’t get home until 8pm now…”, establishes our perspective. We are talking about the time when the speaker comes home, 8pm. The second bit, “by which time the film will have happened,” is our future perfect event. Relative to our perspective, 8pm, the film is over.

Hopefully this helps someone. It works for me. Also, if you have any commentary or ideas of ways I can improve upon this idea, please share! Gratias!

-Beniaminus

Annotationes: verb tense latin grammar latin latin language lingua latina tagamemnon

Aug
18

Nova Iuncta Verba Latina / New Latin Compounds

interretialia:

pulicimercatus -us m. “flea market”
  [pulex “flea” + mercatus “market”]
  [pulic- + mercatu-] stems
  [pulici- + mercatu-] with Connecting Vowel i
  [pulicimercatu-] new stem
  [pulicimercatus] nominative singular

Annotationes: flee market latin latin word formation latin language lingua latina tagamemnon