Fautoritas Linguae Latinae Fautoritas Culturarum Classicarum

Ut sequaris o-eheu in Tumblr Preme ut me sequaris!

O, Eheu!

Jul
25

clioancientart:

Roman bronze swan or goose head, found at Richborough, Kent, England. This may be a model of the Cheniscus or goose head typically mounted on the stern or prow of a Roman ship. It may have adorned a monument with scenes of naval battles and trophies. Now in the British Museum, London.
Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities

clioancientart:

Roman bronze swan or goose head, found at Richborough, Kent, England. This may be a model of the Cheniscus or goose head typically mounted on the stern or prow of a Roman ship. It may have adorned a monument with scenes of naval battles and trophies. Now in the British Museum, London.

Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities

(via c-aesarion)

Annotationes: roman bronze roman art tagamemnon ancient rome

Jul
25

Quote of the Week- July 25th

iam-discite:

Post by: Beniaminus (quote and image)

Approved by: Lana

image

"Quam bene vivas refert, non quam diu."

"It is how well you live that matters, not how long."

Seneca, Epistulae morales ad Lucilium CI

Annotationes: seneca latin quote latin latin language lingua latina tagamemnon

Jul
25

welltemperedklavier:

Bust of The Emperor Commodus as Hercules, unknown artist, 180-193 CE, now in the Capitoline Museum, Rome

welltemperedklavier:

Bust of The Emperor Commodus as Hercules, unknown artist, 180-193 CE, now in the Capitoline Museum, Rome

Annotationes: commodus hercules roman art tagamemnon

Jul
25

Ancient Roman parody of “Thrift Shop” by Macklemore. This was a work of art and I was laughing all the way through.

-Beniaminus

Annotationes: ancient rome roman history roman empire thrift shop tagamemnon

Jul
25

ACLW Day 5- Titus Lucretius Carus

thoodleoo:

image

An engraving of a supposed bust of Lucretius (source). Unfortunately, we have no actual likenesses of Lucretius.

Although Lucretius was a highly-influential Latin author, we know little about his personal life. He lived in the first century BC and was a devoted Epicurean. He knew a certain Memmius, to whom he addresses his De Rerum Natura, and from this some scholars have deduced that he may have known Catullus. His work had influence on Vergil, Horace, and Ovid, at least; even Cicero, who was not the biggest fan of Epicureanism, admitted that Lucretius was a brilliant poet. Other than this, we don’t really have any other information on him.

We have only one of Lucretius’s works (if he ever wrote more than one), the six-book-long De Rerum Natura on Epicureanism. Although it’s a difficult text to translate, both for the difficulty of the Latin and for the subject matter, I think that it’s worth it to translate at least a little of it. Lucretius’s Latin is reminiscent of early Latin poets (although he was also influenced by Greek poetry), and the text is artfully composed- after all, Lucretius himself mentions that his intention was to make Epicurean philosophy more attractive to outsiders through poetry. He also uses plenty of poetic examples to illustrate his points, and the result is a beautiful and entertaining read. Even if you’re not interested in Epicureanism, I highly suggest taking a look at Lucretius.

Reference: Martin Ferguson Smith, Introduction to Hackett Publishing Company, Inc.’s edition of On the Nature of Things.

Annotationes: aclw14 aclw lucretius titus lucretius carus roman literature latin literature tagamemnon

Jul
25

Roman ruins in Jordan. 

(Source: opxpeditions.com, via mythologer)

Annotationes: jordan roman ruins ancient ruins roman architecture tagamemnon

Jul
25

ancientpeoples:

Mosaic Floor from Villelaure with Diana and Callisto Surrounded by Hunt Scenes
Gallo-Roman
3rd century AD.
Source: Los Angeles County Museum of Art

ancientpeoples:

Mosaic Floor from Villelaure with Diana and Callisto Surrounded by Hunt Scenes

Gallo-Roman

3rd century AD.

Source: Los Angeles County Museum of Art

(via mythologer)

Annotationes: gallo-roman roman art roman mosaic roman mythology tagamemnon

Jul
25

hildegardavon:

John Atkinson Grimshaw, 1836-1893
Dido
In Roman mythology, Dido was queen of Carthage, also called Elissa. She was the daughter of a king of Tyre. After her brother Pygmalion murdered her husband, she fled to Libya, where she founded and ruled Carthage. According to one legend, Dido threw herself on a burning pyre to escape marriage to the king of Libya. In the Aeneid, Vergil tells how she fell in love with Aeneas, who had been shipwrecked at Carthage, and destroyed herself on the pyre when, at Jupiter’s command, he left to continue his journey to Italy.
Wikiart

hildegardavon:

John Atkinson Grimshaw, 1836-1893

Dido

In Roman mythology, Dido was queen of Carthage, also called Elissa. She was the daughter of a king of Tyre. After her brother Pygmalion murdered her husband, she fled to Libya, where she founded and ruled Carthage. According to one legend, Dido threw herself on a burning pyre to escape marriage to the king of Libya. In the Aeneid, Vergil tells how she fell in love with Aeneas, who had been shipwrecked at Carthage, and destroyed herself on the pyre when, at Jupiter’s command, he left to continue his journey to Italy.

Wikiart

(via mythologer)

Annotationes: john atkinson grimshaw dido roman mythology tagamemnon

Jul
25

Adamasce te parato non te solitario.
-Beniaminus

Adamasce te parato non te solitario.

-Beniaminus

(Source: weheartit.com, via silly-luv)

Annotationes: fall in love latin latin translation latin language lingua latina tagamemnon

Jul
25

ablative-absolute:

This is the Villa Jovis (House of Jupiter) on the island of Capri in Italy.  Though only accessible by hiking, this palace is well worth the climb!  It was built for emperor Tiberius, who lived there for 10 years of his reign.  Legend has it that he would invite his political “frenemies” up for a vacation and, while they were admiring the view, push them off the cliff.  Because he lived up there, people would just assume that the “frenemy” had taken up residence there as well.

The view is spectacular when you’re not worried about your Latin teacher pulling a Tiberius.

Sources: wikipedia, my Latin teacher

Pictures: most are mine, EXCEPT the one overlooking the entire palace and the drawing of how the palace looked during ancient times.  Those two are from google images.

(via mythologer)

Annotationes: villa jovis capri tiberius roman architecture tagamemnon