Fautoritas Linguae Latinae Fautoritas Culturarum Classicarum

Ut sequaris o-eheu in Tumblr Preme ut me sequaris!

O, Eheu!

Apr
19

"Tibi credo."
-Beniaminus

"Tibi credo."

-Beniaminus

(Source: mostbeautifulquotes)

Annotationes: i believe in you latin latin language lingua latina latin translation tagamemnon

Apr
19

interretialia:

lana-loves-lingua-latina:

boringrocks:

FUN POMPEII FACTS I LEARNED FROM THIS BOOK COVER:
Pompeii was primarily occupied by bobbleheads.
Lots of bobbleheads died in Pompeii, probably because they couldn’t outrun the volcano because their heads were the same size as their bodies.
Pompeii made everyone feel kind of sad, like maybe they dropped an ice cream cone. That’s the emotion they felt.
Ultimately, it was not easy to be an optimist about Pompeii, on account of all the dropped ice cream cones.

OMG WHAT IS THIS

Nescio, sed facit ut rideam. Dunno, but it’s making me laugh.

interretialia:

lana-loves-lingua-latina:

boringrocks:

FUN POMPEII FACTS I LEARNED FROM THIS BOOK COVER:

  • Pompeii was primarily occupied by bobbleheads.
  • Lots of bobbleheads died in Pompeii, probably because they couldn’t outrun the volcano because their heads were the same size as their bodies.
  • Pompeii made everyone feel kind of sad, like maybe they dropped an ice cream cone. That’s the emotion they felt.
  • Ultimately, it was not easy to be an optimist about Pompeii, on account of all the dropped ice cream cones.

OMG WHAT IS THIS

Nescio, sed facit ut rideam. Dunno, but it’s making me laugh.

Annotationes: pompeii mt vesuvius roman history ancient rome tagamemnon latin latin language lingua latina

Apr
19

interretialia:


Cras erit Pascha

chrissymodi-frost:

I have to reboot this today!

interretialia:

Cras erit Pascha

chrissymodi-frost:

I have to reboot this today!

(Source: moveslikecurt)

Annotationes: easter e. aster bunnymund latin latin language lingua latina latin translation tagamemnon

Apr
19

thisandthathistoryblog:

hjuliana:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:


A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.
If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.
Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.
Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL

I found something too awesome not share with you! 
I’m completely fascinated by the history of food, could I choose a similar topic for my Third Year Dissertation? Who knows, but it is very interesting all the same!

thisandthathistoryblog:

hjuliana:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:

A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.

If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.

Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.

Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL

I found something too awesome not share with you! 

I’m completely fascinated by the history of food, could I choose a similar topic for my Third Year Dissertation? Who knows, but it is very interesting all the same!

(Source: wine-loving-vagabond, via the5foot4euphoniumist)

Annotationes: ancient rome tagamemnon bread latin latin language lingua latina

Apr
19

an-amateur-roman:

NEVER FORGET

Io Dies Internationalis Panarie!
-Beniaminus

an-amateur-roman:

NEVER FORGET

Io Dies Internationalis Panarie!

-Beniaminus

Annotationes: ancient rome roman graffiti latin latin language lingua latina tagamemnon

Apr
18

esneiratusfrater:

londonforce:

esneiratusfrater:

lana-loves-lingua-latina:

stunningladysif:

interretialia:

lana-loves-lingua-latina:

the time is now, the world will change

the love we have is here to stay

-Capsule, The Time is Now

———-

Latin Fandom Advertising!

Tempus nunc est! The time is now!

This is just
No

shun the nonbeliever :@

Hail hydra.

image

Pulchrissime est.

(via lana-loves-lingua-latina)

Annotationes: latin fandom tagamemnon latin latin language lingua latina

Apr
18

Anonymous asked: i ship you, hanadoodles and kangaroodle as an ot3 because your URLs all have oodle.

interretialia:

o-eheu:

triumvirate2014:

kangaroodle:

hanadoodles:

thoodleoo:

That sounds like…

*puts on sunglasses*

Oodles of fun

YEAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHH

OH MY GOD

ship name: “the whole kit and caboodle”

This is it, the one true ship of the Latin fandom. ~O

image

Let Us Ship This Ship

-Beniaminus

Naviare? I was thinking of navire (like finire, ignire, sitire).

Navare is regular, but naviare is fine. Naviare is like breviare. And there is already a verb navare, “to perform diligently.” There is also the fact that “shipped” or “having been shipped” could be naviatus, which implies a verb naviare.

Uh… I was going off of that post. I was going for the first person plural subjunctive form. All of the examples you listed (finire, ignire, sitire) end in -iamus in that form, so…

-Beniaminus

Annotationes: latin latin language lingua latina tagamemnon

Apr
18

romegreeceart:

Roman mosaic
Early 5th century AD
Mausoleum of Santa Constanza, Ravenna

romegreeceart:

Roman mosaic

Early 5th century AD

Mausoleum of Santa Constanza, Ravenna

(Source: lineaserpentinata.blogspot.fi)

Annotationes: roman art ancient rome latin tagamemnon latin language lingua latina

Apr
18

the-fault-in-marys-life:

mediocre-latinist:

afacethatsunk1000ships:

princedorkface:

So we got new Latin books today and my teacher immediately told us to turn to page 81.

This is the original picture:

image

A picture of a statue of Poseidon.

But look at some of the treasures we found:

image

Rockstar dominatrix Poseidon.

image

Old woman Poseidon.

BUT THIS IS WHERE WE LOST IT…

image

X-MEN CYCLOPES POSEIDON

image

AND MASTER CHIEF POSEIDON

the cyclops one is particularly good bc one of Poseidon’s actual sons was a cyclops (polyphemus)

Accurate.

Annotationes: poseidon mythology learning latin latin latin language lingua latina tagamemnon

Apr
17

uchicagoadmissions:

camiwild:

I love these dogs, and I’ve never met them. Boo means business. Buddy doesn’t look so sure of his guard dog skills.

I’ll just leave this here for the requisite daily dose of adorableness…



Cave Canes

-Beniaminus

uchicagoadmissions:

camiwild:

I love these dogs, and I’ve never met them. Boo means business. Buddy doesn’t look so sure of his guard dog skills.

I’ll just leave this here for the requisite daily dose of adorableness…

Cave Canes

-Beniaminus

Annotationes: cave canem latin latin language lingua latina tagamemnon